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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Where Is It Safe to Swim?

Clean Water Advocates Monitor Local Rivers and Reservoirs to Inform the Public

Through the Rogue Riverkeeper water quality monitoring program, water quality tests at a number of popular swimming and boating sites in our region will be used to update free website and smartphone apps to inform the public.

Jun 26, 2014

Clean Water Advocates Monitor Local Rivers and Reservoirs to Inform the Public

Contact
Forrest English, Rogue Riverkeeper, 541-488-9831

 

emigrant reservoir samplingAshland, OR — Do you wonder if the water at your favorite swimming hole is clean?

Rogue Riverkeeper has launched local monitoring sites for The Swim Guide, a free smart phone app and interactive website. The Swim Guide that provides up-to-date water quality information in the Rogue, Applegate and Illinois Valleys. Through the Rogue Riverkeeper water quality monitoring program, water quality tests at a number of popular swimming and boating sites in our region will be used to keep the website and app up-to- date .

“We get asked all the time about safety of the water,” said Forrest English with Rogue Riverkeeper. “Now we can use recent information to answer those questions.”

Rogue Riverkeeper collects samples weekly from June through October at Emigrant Lake, Lost Creek Lake, the Rogue River at Gold Hill and Grants Pass, the Illinois River at Six Mile and the Applegate River at Cantrall Buckley Park. Information is also included from the City of Ashland along Ashland Creek as it flows through Lithia Park and notices from Oregon Health Authority when appropriate.

“Bacteria pollution is a significant issue for the Rogue. Especially in light of the drought, this could be an important year for the public to be well informed about any pollution and how it may affect them and their plans to get in the water,” continued English.

With low water levels due to the drought, water pollution may be a bigger issue this year than most. In addition to answering the immediate questions regarding public safety during the summer, the data is provided to state and federal agencies and used to guide decisions that affect the management of the watershed.

The Swim Guide utilizes water quality monitoring data from government authorities and non-profits using the same methods to determine the water quality at over 2,500 beaches in the United States and is updated as frequently as the water quality information is gathered.

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