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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Rogue Riverkeeper unveils film as Clean Water Act turns 40

Marking the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, Rogue Riverkeeper released a new film today that focuses on the impacts of exporting U.S. natural gas through southern Oregon.

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Oct 18, 2012

Ashland, OR—Marking the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, Rogue Riverkeeper released a new film today that focuses on the impacts of exporting U.S. natural gas through southern Oregon.

The proposed Jordan Cove and Pacific Connector liquefied natural gas (LNG) project is the focus of a short film created by Rogue Riverkeeper and award-winning filmmaker Trip Jennings of Balance Media. The film explores the impacts of the LNG export proposal from three distinct perspectives; private landowners facing the use of eminent domain; fishermen and river advocates concerned about the impacts to our rivers and threatened salmon; and the impacts to U.S. gas consumers.

Today, Rogue Riverkeeper, other U.S. Waterkeepers and communities across the nation are celebrating the 40th birthday of the Clean Water Act. Demanded by voters, Congress overruled President Nixon's veto of the bill and embarked on a goal of making our rivers, lakes and streams safe for swimming, fishing and drinking. Gains from this landmark law have been huge, with many of the blatantly obvious pollution sources cleaned up through government regulation and citizen enforcement of the law. For example, the Cuyahoga River in Ohio no longer bursts into flame from chemical pollution. However, much work remains to make our public waters fishable, swimmable and drinkable. 

“As we celebrate the gains made since the passage of the Clean Water Act, we must contemplate the water challenges we will face in the decades to come, “ said Forrest English, Program Director for Rogue Riverkeeper. “The proposed LNG pipeline is one example of a project that would not only harm our precious water resources, but also negatively impact landowners and U.S. gas rates.”

The proposed LNG export project would require Clean Water Act permits to build the terminal in Coos Bay and cross the Coos, Coquille, Umpqua, Rogue and Klamath Rivers, as well as more than 350 smaller tributary streams in those watersheds. Many of these streams provide habitat critical for threatened salmon and other fish. The project would require a 235-mile clearcut through 80 miles of public land and 155 miles of private property. Hundreds of private landowners are threatened with the use eminent domain and the seizure of their property so that energy companies can export U.S. natural gas.

Transforming the U.S. into an LNG export nation would further increase demand for dangerous extraction methods in the Rocky Mountains and other areas of the nation where “fracking” takes place. In addition to the environmental impacts, exporting natural gas would drive up U.S. gas prices for residential, commercial and industrial use. 

You can watch the short film online by visiting www.rogueriverkeeper.org/LNG.

Rogue Riverkeeper is a non-profit organization that works to protect and restore water quality and fish populations in the Rogue River Basin and adjacent coastal watersheds through enforcement, advocacy, field work and community action.

 

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